What is The Cost of Your Anger?
19th December 2017Anger, Blog Standard

What is The Cost of Your Anger?

Have you thought about the many different aspects relating to the cost of uncontrolled, oror aggressive behaviour? These costs relate to the social impact your behaviour has on legal constructs, working opportunities, relationships and the most prevalent of all, your emotional wellbeing and health.

When your anger manifests in aggression there are many legal and emotional issues you may be forced to deal with. This anger when it has reached the extreme level of breaching legal boundaries, is sadly under diagnosed, which is why we have so much child abuse, marital abuse, rape and criminality in our world. Dealing with your anger before it reaches this drastic point, is vital in any civilised society.

The causes of so much hostility in our society are often associated with a lack of environmental structures, in families and marital relationships. Today, our society has become so hard-wired towards consumerism, that the blame for the diminishing control over family bonds is so often attributed to a feeling of hopelessness when you are unable to control the basic urges of jealousy, or health and safety, which result from your diminished self-esteem. These elements of lack of control are born of a sense of powerlessness. Day after day, the television, radio and social media are imploring you to purchase more and more consumer goods, without giving adequate recognition to the negative side effects of this consumer driven society.

The result of such behaviour is manifest in areas like road rage, inflicted on other motorists or pedestrians because of a feeling that our personal space, or inalienable rights have been somehow trampled over by another individual or group. When we believe our rights, or dignity have been eroded, we react negatively, instead of recognising the true reasons for this feeling of powerlessness. So often the cause is a lack of self-esteem, and can be countered by dealing with the reason underlying that hostility.

Although it may be therapeutic to rant, or blow some steam off, when getting angry results in words being thrown; there is a legal consequence once that boundary has been breached and there is aggression shown, resulting in physical harm. Such irrational behaviour can result in guilt, embarrassment, shame and remorse, or worse, legal ramifications and prison .

In our workplace, it is vital for you to maintain a rational, effective communication between yourself and colleagues, but when this descends into insults, or worse still, devious attempts to undermine someone, the effect negatively impacts on both the person to whom it is directed and to yourself, in the long term. This form of bitterness, or jealousy can result in impaired judgement and result in poor choices. The truth about holding something against someone; is that you are required to have to shadow them, to keep holding it against them. Letting go of ill feelings, or jealousy requires a leap of faith, but once that animosity has been released, there is an opportunity for you to heal and develop your self-esteem.

The most common relationships at home, and with family and friends, requires tolerance and understanding. When this area of the relationship is challenged, then the door is opened to all facets of negative behaviour.

Empathy and compassion does conquer all thoughts of inadequacy and cements relationships.